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Pete Hamill , volume editor, is a celebrated novelist and columnist who currently writes for the New York Daily News. This Library of America series edition is printed on acid-free paper and features Smyth-sewn binding, a full cloth cover, and a ribbon marker.

Studs Lonigan

This volume is available for adoption in the Guardian of American Letters Fund. Subscribers can purchase the slipcased edition by signing in to their accounts.

Discount offer available for first-time customers only. With contributions from donors, Library of America preserves and celebrates a vital part of our cultural heritage for generations to come. Back James T. He is boiling up with anger and wants to take on the world with his fists and is not ashamed to use them on men or women. As young boys, Studs and Weary go at it, with Studs the victor, but Studs believes Weary will get his comeuppance and he surely does, in a shameless way with resulting ruin.

It was nice sitting there. A bird cooed above them. He usually thought it was sissified to listen or pay attention to such things as birds singing; it was crazy, like being a guy who studied music, or read too many books, or wrote poems and painted pictures. But now he listened; it was nice; he told himself how nice it was. He had been sold out, and made the goat. Most of the other waiters had crawled back on heir knees, begging for their jobs at any salary, under any condition. Yellow scabs! They had betrayed him, betrayed the cause of the American working man. They had betrayed themselves.

The rankling of defeat and disappointment grew upon him until her cursed, using the filthiest words he knew. He could see the lagoon, steely, dark, glittering here and there with the moon and stars. The World, the night, the park, spring that was going to come, it was all new. He felt as if he were discovering them for the first time in his life, as if the sense of budding things, of leaves coming out on the branches, the gradual warming and laziness in the air, the grass bursting green through the cold, hard, wintry earth, as if all these were inside of him.

The car clattered over a small stone bridge, affording him momentary sight of a thing stream of steely-colored water. The engine emitted a piercing and desolate whistle that seemed to puncture the countryside with echoing loneliness, and he was reminded of how, as a young kid, he head heard train whistles at night, even ducking his head under the covers because of them. Given that, I decided to note them here anyway. Since you can probably imagine my drooling over Mr. Farrell had a keen talent for portraying the darkness found in all of us; pettiness, jealousy, doubt and fear.

Its an ability that would sure be swell to have. My rating for The Studs Lonigan Triology is a 10 out of Sep 09, Billy Baker rated it it was amazing. I hope I never have to read a page book on the train ever again. Gives another and more personal perspective of the same.

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In he graduates from what we'd call Junior High. Studs though hasn't learned much and like his friends they all feel Young Lonigan A good read and complement to similar historical context books of the era such as John Dos Passos, USA trilogy. Studs though hasn't learned much and like his friends they all feel they barely survived the Nuns.

I found this hilarious as that's what all my college roommates said about their Catholic schooling. Some things don't change. The author depcits a world where each street is a neighborhood and those a world to their own, that of turf wars and petty crime, standard young man mischief as Stud's wrestles with his teenage angst.

Young Manhood Studs moves from young ruffian to seeing the light, maturing and joining his father's painting business. Interesting background events are the signs of African-Americans moving into South Chicago, the Jews are blamed for financial ills and the Irish Catholics stick together at least in their hatred of other groups. Bootleg Gin, sex and the risk of venereal disease are also subjects, I imagine it was 'racy' for a s novel. The VD troubles many of the guys and some die from it. The Final Judgement with that ominous title starts the Depression and Studs being sickly from drinking.

Eerie predictions and observations on the stock market, which match today's finances. Everyone thinking, hoping things will get better soon. Fascinating cultural events - grapefruit diets are big. Fun insight into that phenomena. Everyone thinks it's silly, but they watch addicted like a soap opera, or mmm American Idol. Their boom in enrollment is a sign of the times, people bonding through organizations when financial times are tough, a way of what we call networking, feeling a brotherhood.

Apr 10, Ian rated it it was ok Shelves: usa , literature. Don't let the straightforward style fool you, this is a difficult novel. It's not the style though, it's more the scope and content. Any readers particularly squeamish about a lot of racism, ethnic bigotry, sexism, and homophobia are advised to stay away, because the words "nigger" and "kike" are not used sparingly or glibly.

I will admit that I was frustrated and sick of this book for a large percentage of it, but I know that the end effect would not have been the same if I didn't read it all. But it takes a brave reader to get there. I think one of the most frustrating things about this book is how the titular Studs never seems to learn anything, change, or even consider his situation in a really intelligent level throughout the whole proceedings.

It can be frustrating because it makes him hard to identify with. He really seems like an unusually thick individual. But in a lot of ways, this is what makes the book so powerful. It's about a young dreamer who refuses to change and is, in turned, crushed by a world that can't make room for someone so resistant to the serious.

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Studs Lonigan

The Penguin edition has a great epilogue which wasn't published with the book before and only recovered a number of years after its initial run. I admit that I only skimmed through it this time because I was MORE than ready to put this book aside, but it's really incredibly written. I need to re-read the epilogue with greater attention next time not ashamed to admit that I'll probably never read this book again though….

Studs Lonigan, the great american dreamer.

James T. Farrell: Studs Lonigan: A Trilogy | Library of America

This character is similar in his abject failures to Jude The Obscure. An indolent and floundering wanna-be. He holds tightly to two fleeting moments in his life an afternoon with a girl and a fight with a dude. He hopes for great things, dreams about them and gives us alot of introspection and yet he can achieve nothing because he never does anything except hang out in poolrooms, fight, talk with repugnance and vulgarity about women, and hope that som Studs Lonigan, the great american dreamer.

He hopes for great things, dreams about them and gives us alot of introspection and yet he can achieve nothing because he never does anything except hang out in poolrooms, fight, talk with repugnance and vulgarity about women, and hope that some great thing will happen to him. This book is stark, dark and dreary realism, set during the great depression, and gives a good feel about the general anxiety of the depression, panic over bank closures, plunging stocks and paranoia over "reds". Unfortunately, it also paints a savage portrait of the racism and bigotry of those times.

It is difficult to read about those events, and yet Farrell certainly doesn't sugar coat anything and since there wasn't such a thing as political correctness in , the facts are blatantly told in idiomatic detail. I don't know what to say: this book uses the words "kike" and "nigger" on practically every page, and the "hero" regularly blames all "kikes" and "niggers" for all of his problems. You keep expecting some reversal of his ignorant, red-neck, narrow-minded point of view, but it never comes.

Although the novel is 'rescued,' to some degree, in the last pages it is epic , I am still wondering why in the hell it was ever published by The Modern Library. I thought I could COUNT on them to distill t I don't know what to say: this book uses the words "kike" and "nigger" on practically every page, and the "hero" regularly blames all "kikes" and "niggers" for all of his problems. Of course, they also publish Ulysses, and count it as one of the great accomplishments of Western Lit. I guess that's a little ambiguous thankfully.

Nov 10, Cyril rated it really liked it. Who was Studs Lonigan? He was just another tough-guy wannabe who lived in the early part of the twentieth century. He was a lower middle-class Irish-American unable to escape the world he was born to. He was just like millions of other faceless man who lived at the same time.


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However, there was much more to him than that. Farrell reveals a complex inner dialogue that Studs is never able to really understand or express. The life of Studs is filled with racism, sexism, alcoholism - presented witho Who was Studs Lonigan? The life of Studs is filled with racism, sexism, alcoholism - presented without judgement. Studs is clearly not a sympathetic character, but he is an archetype for many men of the same era. Greg and I began Young Lonigan a few weeks ago.

Patrick M. Quinn

I came across this author's name while preparing for a Naturialism course. Farrell seems to be one of the lesser known authors of the genre. Stusa is a funny character who is easy for a reader to become interested in.